Views: 286

Replies to This Discussion

I like the seeming simplicity of this - the yin/yang nature of it.  Thought of Ichthus the fish used to represent Christ.    Googled it and turned up  the Greek/Roman Pagan origins of it. It was used to depict feminine deity and fertility.  They used two crescent moons in a similar arrangement it seems.

This is a mandala that caught me just now - called Heart Rock, from 14 Digital Art by Laila Kujala.  I've been struggling to fit my response to Dharmavidya's post in the appropriate place - the great god ning won't let me!

 

 

I havent not read but I sure is interresting the book: Primordial Aesthetics and Visionary Art of Elias Capriles.

the resume of the first capter:

http://webdelprofesor.ula.ve/humanidades/elicap/en/uploads/Bibliote...

In the first chapter of this book, Capriles explains the genesis of value and values as a result of the manifestation and development of the delusion that the Buddha Shakyamuni called avidya and that Heraclitus referred to as lete, which introduces the “original (and originary) partition” corresponding to the etymological meaning of the German word Urteil (judgment). In fact, once delusion arises, involving the belief in a self or ego, selfishness or egotism arises, and thus in order to restrain it and prevent its negative effects it becomes necessary to invent morality; once totality is sundered by the subject-object duality, there arises the lack-of-totality or lack-of-plenitude that may be called “existential poverty,” and as a result of this there arises economic value; once Truth is concealed, truth is conceived as adæquatio intellectus et rei; and once the doors of perception are closed, so that we no longer appreciate everything in its infinitude and wonder, we distinguish between the beautiful and the ugly, the sublime and the ridicule, and so aesthetic values arise. Concerning the latter, Capriles discusses the Pythagorean concept of kalokagathia and the Platonic inseparability of Truth, Good and Beauty—which, however, he explains in an anti-Pythagorean, anti-Platonic way. Then he ponders on the aim and meaning of primordial art, and discusses the effects of the development of delusion and concealment in Eurasian art, which he takes as the basis for outlining a degenerative aesthetic theory. In Chapter Two he reviews: the development of concealment and unconcealment in Eurasia from the Stone Age to the Age of Metals; the prehistoric Eurasian artistic koiné and the arising of the Buddhist Art of Central Asia; the aim and meaning of Eastern art and ancient Western art; the destruction of the Medieval order in Europe and the new developments of concealment and unconcealment in this region. Then he reviews primordial art, from primitive art to Chinese Taoist and Ch’an painting (with reference to craftsmanship, sacred dances and fireworks); he draws brief notes on some art forms from India; he considers Tibetan painting, taking the mandala as a paradigm of the inseparability of connotation and denotation, and discusses the relationship between Dante’s Divine Comedy and the mandala (and, in the forthcoming second edition of the book, also between these and William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell). Then he takes the movie Baraka as an example of primordial art of the end of the twentieth century, considering it in terms of the mandala, and speculates about the future of art. Finally, in Chapter Three he discusses the aesthetics of the surpassing being (which he views as the most basic, delusive phenomenon of samsara) in terms of a critique of the ontology and aesthetics developed by Martin Heidegger, with reference to those by Kant and Schopenhauer. Here the relationship between being and value is analyzed, together with the relations between art and truth, aesthetics and ontology.

Yes, Capriles seems to be a very interesting character.

Speaking of delusion, here's an optical illusion

Though not formally a mandala, I think this object is in way a mandala. It is a variation on the Newton disk (the colour circle). When the newton disk rotates at high speed the 7 colours mix and become -theoretically- white. Within each concentric circle I rearranged the different colours. Each circle has 6 pixels of the same colour, so in total for every concentric circle there's 6 times the 7 colours of the rainbow: 42 elements. It is also an attempt to an icon, the pixels should form a recognizable portrait, but the resolotion is not big enough with only 42 times 17 pixels. (17 is the amount of concentric circles). Part of the difficulty of making a portrait in this frame is the restriction on the colours, since every circle has the seven colours in an equal ratio.

The joke so to say is that this mosaic is self-effacing, referring to the no 8 picture of the ox pictures ('the ox forgotten, man forgotten').



Eduardo Oca said:

I havent not read but I sure is interresting the book: Primordial Aesthetics and Visionary Art of Elias Capriles.

the resume of the first capter:

http://webdelprofesor.ula.ve/humanidades/elicap/en/uploads/Bibliote...

In the first chapter of this book, Capriles explains the genesis of value and values as a result of the manifestation and development of the delusion that the Buddha Shakyamuni called avidya and that Heraclitus referred to as lete, which introduces the “original (and originary) partition” corresponding to the etymological meaning of the German word Urteil (judgment). In fact, once delusion arises, involving the belief in a self or ego, selfishness or egotism arises, and thus in order to restrain it and prevent its negative effects it becomes necessary to invent morality; once totality is sundered by the subject-object duality, there arises the lack-of-totality or lack-of-plenitude that may be called “existential poverty,” and as a result of this there arises economic value; once Truth is concealed, truth is conceived as adæquatio intellectus et rei; and once the doors of perception are closed, so that we no longer appreciate everything in its infinitude and wonder, we distinguish between the beautiful and the ugly, the sublime and the ridicule, and so aesthetic values arise. Concerning the latter, Capriles discusses the Pythagorean concept of kalokagathia and the Platonic inseparability of Truth, Good and Beauty—which, however, he explains in an anti-Pythagorean, anti-Platonic way. Then he ponders on the aim and meaning of primordial art, and discusses the effects of the development of delusion and concealment in Eurasian art, which he takes as the basis for outlining a degenerative aesthetic theory. In Chapter Two he reviews: the development of concealment and unconcealment in Eurasia from the Stone Age to the Age of Metals; the prehistoric Eurasian artistic koiné and the arising of the Buddhist Art of Central Asia; the aim and meaning of Eastern art and ancient Western art; the destruction of the Medieval order in Europe and the new developments of concealment and unconcealment in this region. Then he reviews primordial art, from primitive art to Chinese Taoist and Ch’an painting (with reference to craftsmanship, sacred dances and fireworks); he draws brief notes on some art forms from India; he considers Tibetan painting, taking the mandala as a paradigm of the inseparability of connotation and denotation, and discusses the relationship between Dante’s Divine Comedy and the mandala (and, in the forthcoming second edition of the book, also between these and William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell). Then he takes the movie Baraka as an example of primordial art of the end of the twentieth century, considering it in terms of the mandala, and speculates about the future of art. Finally, in Chapter Three he discusses the aesthetics of the surpassing being (which he views as the most basic, delusive phenomenon of samsara) in terms of a critique of the ontology and aesthetics developed by Martin Heidegger, with reference to those by Kant and Schopenhauer. Here the relationship between being and value is analyzed, together with the relations between art and truth, aesthetics and ontology.

RSS

ITZI Conference 2019

Subscribe to ITZI Conference Newsletter

* indicates required

Blog Posts

Standing Watch

Posted by Robert Joshin Althouse on April 5, 2020 at 20:17 0 Comments

Fragile Nature

Posted by Dayamay Dunsby on April 5, 2020 at 11:34 1 Comment

I found this lovely quote in a book about Jizo bodhisattva:



"We perceive the fragile nature of our human life and it makes us afraid. As protection against the inevitable assaults of a human life - separations, failures, abuse, illness and death - we construct a set of strategies and defences called a self. Each time we perceive danger we fortify the defences until we find ourselves trapped and isolated inside its walls. Like a stone or wooden Jizo, we are frozen and lifeless. We… Continue

© 2020   Created by David Brazier.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service