Purser, R.E., Forbes,D. & Burke,A. (editors) 2016. Handbook of Mindfulness: Culture, context, and social engagement, Switzerland: Springer International. 514 pages. 33 chapters, including one by myself.

My copy of this large collection arrived in the post while i was away. I don't expect that i shall get around to reading it all but there are certainly some interesting essays here. With Ron Purser as the lead editor one can take it that this is not simply a eulogy of all that is good about mindfulness. There are some critical notes here. What is the relationship of mindfulness to ethics? Is secularising a religious discipline really a good idea? Is this just a transient fad? Is the great mountain of 'research' all it is cracked up to be? These are some of the questions that crop up in a number of the chapters.

The book is in five sections: 1. Between Tradition & Modernity; 2. Neoliberal Mindfulness versus Critical Mindfulness; 3. Geneologies of Mindfulness Based Interventions; 4. Mindfulness as Critical Pedagogy; 5 Commentary. Part One has chapters by Bhikkhu Bodhi, David Loy, Richard King, Geoffrey Samuel, Candy Guenther Brown,  Jack Petranker and myself. Part Two includes chapters with such titles as "Corporate Mindfulness and the Pathologisation of Workplace Stress", "Mindfulness as an Opiate of the Middle Classes", "Mindfulness and the Moral Imperative for the Self to Improve the Self" and five others. In Part Three, Manu Bazzano has a chapter called "The Fourth Treasure: Psychotherapy's Contribution to the Dharma" and David Lewis & Deborah Rozelle have "Mindfulness Based Interventions: Clinical Psychology, Buddhadharma or Both? A Wisdom Perspective". Part Four is mostly about ethics and education.

The book is not cheap. If you save a dollar a day for a year you might be able to afford one. So to read it you might need to convince your institution that they have to have this in their library.

https://www.amazon.com/Handbook-Mindfulness-Culture-Engagement-Beha...

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Posted by Dayamay Dunsby on April 16, 2018 at 8:00 0 Comments

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Posted by David Brazier on March 19, 2018 at 21:43 1 Comment

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