This easy to read book explores the seam between Neuroscience and Vajrayana. Using Medicine Buddha as the example of how gazing at images or pictures, or even imagining harmonious physical environments and loving beings creates measurable change for the better in our brains. Once our brains change, our minds follow and from there a cascade of improved moods, attitudes, behaviours ensues. This is not a self-help book but a book that sets out in simple to understand terms from Neuroscience the facts of how our brains work. The rest is up to you.

The clear and dynamic preface by David Brazier sets the tone for what continues throughout: intelligent discussion about the human brain, East and West, drawing from the most ancient techniques of Tibetan Buddhism, Vajrayana, and from the most startlingly new revelations from the West in Neuroscience.

Where some may have struggled in the past with faith concerning meditation on the various Vajrayana figures, that faith is now supported by science fact. Neuroscience expresses how our brains respond to continued gazing at tangkas and reciting mantras. The book also searches through the latest in Neuroscience regarding pain, discovering what antiques teachings have claimed for thousands of years: it doesn't exist in the way we normally think it does. For anyone interested in pain management indeed in healing from pain, this book offers information from psychiatrist and pain specialist Michael Moscowitz.

Finally that most elusive and troublesome aspect for any meditator: the belief in a self, here explored through Body Mapping. The self as related through body boundaries emerges as a chameleon, a kind of shape shifter capable of adapting to whatever our senses fix upon. When our senses fix upon the iconography of Vajrayana we indeed shift the shape of ourselves: toward being more compassionate, more insightful and more loving. 

Available at www.soulsciences.net 

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ITZI Conference 2017

Blog Posts

Relationship.

Posted by Adam Dunsby on September 9, 2017 at 20:56 0 Comments

Found this on a Chogyam Trungpa video…

''The relationship between student and teacher is like a dance…

In relating with the teacher, your critical input and your surrendering work together. They’re not working against each other. The more input you get from the teacher and the phenomenal world and the more you develop, at the same time, the more you question. So there is a kind of dance taking place between the teacher and yourself. You are not particularly trying to switch off…

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Reflections on Foolishness.

Posted by Adam Dunsby on September 5, 2017 at 11:50 2 Comments

I sometimes can’t believe how defective I am!! Whilst despairing of myself the other day I remembered a Shinran teaching that I found some time ago. It really made me think and reinforced my resolve to practice.

It is a Pureland teaching about the depth of our sin preventing us from being genuinely good. Our efforts to be decent, caring beings are always based in and therefore contaminated by our self centredness, greed hatred and delusion. This is due to the…

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Korean Version of Workshops

Posted by JAESUNG KIM on August 6, 2017 at 6:58 0 Comments

2017 여름 불교심리치료 및 상담 워크숍 3회 내용

THREE PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING WORKSHOPS

 

WORKSHOP 1: SNOW UPON A SILVER PLATE [ 銀盌盛雪]: PRINCIPLES OF BUDDHIST PSYCHOLOGY & THEIR PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC APPLICATION

In this workshop we shall introduce and review important aspects of Buddhist psychology including the conditioned and unconditioned mind, object relatedness, skandha process, the unity of path and goal, bodhichitta,…

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Great Intentions.

Posted by Adam Dunsby on August 3, 2017 at 22:42 0 Comments

  • The power of intentions is a topic that comes up regularly for me and always provides me with food for thought. In a recent service I was struck by the gravity of the Bodhisattva vows that we sing as part of our liturgy. ”Innumerable…

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