Buddhism makes much of 'impermanence'. This has several to it.

1. These teachings tell us that all the conditions that we meet within samsara are fragile. Whatever circumstances we may build our expectations upon, they can never be wholly relied upon. Simply recognising this can lead us to be more 'philosophical' when things do not work out as we expect. You might campaign for one thing and the other eventuates - are you going to mope, or grasp the nettle?

2. The Buddha saw beings 'rising and falling according to their deeds'. Sometimes people seem to be doing well, yet are unhappy inside. Sometimes others seem to be doing badly, yet have inner strength. It is difficult to tell the inner story. As conditions unfold over time each person is tested and the quality of their life bears fruit. Sometimes one gets one's comeuppance. We can have sympathy.

3. Teachings on impermanence also impart urgency. Time is short. We only have this human body for a brief period. It is no use waiting for life to begin or the right conditions to show up. This is it. If we are going to have a meaningful life, this is the time to get on with it.

4. Whatever disaster befalls, whatever terrible circumstance arises, it will pass. A storm rarely lasts all day. Therefore we should cultivate patience. Don't get caught up in ignoble words and deeds that are but the froth of the moment. Take a longer term view.

5. Impermanence offers no permanent succour. While engaging with impermanent conditions, it is also important to seek a more reliable refuge. Not everything is impermanent. Buddhism orients us to nirvana. By having faith that transcends the impermanent world we find the core of the Dharma.

These five points, to be philosophical, to have sympathy, to not waste time, to be patient and to seek a true refuge go the the heart of the matter.

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ITZI Conference 2017

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Bombu Magic.

Posted by Dayamay Dunsby on March 14, 2018 at 10:31 0 Comments

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From ''The Essential Shinran.''

A Day at the Seaside ~ Una giornata al Mare (in Italiano & English)

Posted by David Brazier on March 5, 2018 at 20:30 0 Comments

Ho alzato alle sette e ho preso colazione alle otto. Era un colazione grande e bellissimo con una diverse seleccione di succi, cereale, panne, briochi, frutta, yoghurt, marmellate, miele, uova, e cose cosi, con caffè buono e molto latte caldo.

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The Zen Weekend on 16th June

Posted by George Daly on March 4, 2018 at 19:57 1 Comment

Hi David
Angela and I are very interested in attending your Zen
weekend on 16 and 17 th June.
I am not sure if this is the right way to register
our interest. If not, do tell me.
It would be good to meet up again and to see Eleusis.

Ritorno all'Eden ~ Back to Eden (Italiano & English)

Posted by David Brazier on March 4, 2018 at 15:00 3 Comments

Ero alzato di pronto. Andavo a piedi i tre isolati fino al garage, pausando per strada, per un caffè e brioche alla "bar degli artisti". Guidavo la macchina a casa e ho trovato un parking in centro di Via Abbruzzi. Ho tornato a casa e mi ho fatto una colazione e completato il mio pacco. Ho detto arrivederci alla padrona di casa e me ne sono andato. Sono andato da Milano alle otto. Era zero gradi. Guidavo al sud ovest verso Genova tra campi da neve: panorama bellissima. Mi sentava…


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