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TAO & EASTERN WISDOM

This is a group for non-Buddhist oriental thought, religion, philosophy, art & culture

Members: 33
Latest Activity: on Thursday

Discussion Forum

TAO TE CHING 35: Realpolitik

Started by David Brazier. Last reply by Désirée Verstraete May 12. 1 Reply

TAO TE CHING 35: The elephant

Started by David Brazier May 5. 0 Replies

TAO TE CHING 33: Those who endure

Started by David Brazier Apr 26. 0 Replies

TAO TE CHING 32: Know when to stop

Started by David Brazier Apr 22. 0 Replies

TAO TE CHING 30: Non-coercion

Started by David Brazier. Last reply by Kaspalita Apr 12. 1 Reply

Introduction to Daoism.mp3

Started by Susthama Kim. Last reply by Nati Apr 4. 2 Replies

TAO TE CHING 28: The Dark Wisdom

Started by David Brazier. Last reply by David Brazier Mar 29. 3 Replies

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Comment by David Brazier on April 23, 2016 at 15:52

I have now brought the Tao Te Ching translation and commentary up to and including Chapter Eight

Comment by David Brazier on March 6, 2016 at 19:37

Thank you, Massimo. It is wonderful to have personal sharing of this kind. I have done small amounts of tai Chi at various times in my life but never gone into it in depth.

Comment by Massimo Tomassini on March 6, 2016 at 19:32

I've always been fascinated by Taoism and started practicing thai chi in 1998 with a Chinese master in Rome. I practiced very regularly up to 1996, when many things changed  in my life. I abandoned the master (after a trip to China in which I had some disagreements with him and other disciples). I kept on practicing by myself for a long time, but with increasing difficulties. I quitted when the Buddhist practice (Thich Nhath Han first, then  vipassana, in between Mahasi and A. Chah) saturated all spaces dedicated to "spirituality" (strange word) in my mind and life. I re-started thai-chi four years ago with a local teacher, in a gym very close to my house. I discovered a more plain way of practicing, much more careful than in my previous experience about the precision of the form. My teacher also teaches Kung Fu. He frequently explains the practical (for combat)  nature of all, even minimal, gestures of thai-chi. He helps us (also with exercises in couples) in understanding the reason of each movement and the need for a continuous vigilance and control of arms, legs, spine, etc.. It is not at all a war-hungry training. It's a way for looking at things as they are. I must say: for looking at what the mind is doing, at the co-relation of mind and body, at the being-there, in space and time.  I'm amazed in discovering  aspects of myself (even unpleasant and painful) whose existence was always supposed or taken for granted but never really experienced.  My phenomenological bent (recently very much grown up at the theory and research level) is very much stimulated. I think I'm approaching a position in which Tao, Dhamma and "things themselves" are increasingly converging on the basis of a very live experience (for somebody maybe trivial and "non-spiritual").

All the above is just for sharing and explaining a bit the kind of attitude with which I'll follow the teachings on the Tao.  

Comment by David Brazier on March 6, 2016 at 11:43

Annie - thank you. Lots of good things here, do explore and go on adding comments. Super. Each group has a discussion forum - such as we are writing on here - but within each discussion there is a facility for adding comments and that is where most discussions evolve.

Comment by David Brazier on March 6, 2016 at 11:41

Massimo, i am not a Tai Chi expert, but there may well be other people on this site who know better than I.

Comment by Annie Parry on March 4, 2016 at 12:49
Hi, I'll see if this reaches you - not so skilled at putting word bites into the correct boxes, as demonstrated by my earlier comment re your poem David, which went to your daughters website..apologies will do better:)

I am delighted with this arena and am experientially exploring aligned meanings within my Awakening the body teaching and practise. Great to have input and access to some scholarly minds.
Comment by David Brazier on March 4, 2016 at 11:05

Ah, I'm glad that this group seems to strike a chord with a number of people. I hope we can have some good discussions here. I wanted to include some Chinese wisdom on the site going beyond Buddhist sources and it did not seem to fit into the Hellenica/Pagan group so I have started this one. I want to keep the number of groups to a minimum or the site becomes difficult to find one's way around, but in this case, a new group does seem warranted. Also, there is so much in the Taoistic way of things that tallies with the atmosphere at La Ville au Roi (Eleusis) where we very much take our cue from nature. We can say it is the Way of the Gods (as in Shinto) but that Way is reveals in Nature. I agree with Kaspa that there is an interesting (fascinating even) tension between these ideas and the notion of other power in Pureland Buddhism. Lots to explore and contemplate and work with.

Comment by Priti Vaishnav on March 4, 2016 at 5:51
This is going to be very useful as I have always been interested in Taoism. Thank you.
Comment by Massimo Tomassini on March 3, 2016 at 23:31

I'm interested in knowing what I do when I do thai chi

 

Comment by Kaspalita on March 3, 2016 at 22:50
I've recently been reading and listening to Alan Watts commenting on Taoism, and its set up a fruitful tension between Taoist and Pureland Buddhist ideas. So I'll look forward to the discussion here.
 
 
 

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Blog Posts

Sit

Posted by Geeta Chari on April 26, 2019 at 22:13 3 Comments

This is a short video of a Buddhist monk and his family. 

It raised questions on parenting and Buddhism - does detachment (or perhaps quietism), as practiced here, lead to demotivation and disengagement with the world around one?

His children find the detachment practised by the monk disquieting. They appreciate the irony of detachment, which is supposed to…

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Zero Limits

Posted by Dayamay Dunsby on April 20, 2019 at 14:13 0 Comments

 

 

 

I have recently been made aware of a practice known as Ho’ponopono. Ho’ponopono is an ancient Hawaiian healing practice, based on universal forgiveness, that was rediscovered and popularised in the 80s. A man called Joe Vitale(Hawaiian I think)  became enchanted by the practice after his daughter was healed from an…

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Obstructions

Posted by Susthama Kim on April 16, 2019 at 21:30 0 Comments

My children, Floor and I have been at Eleusis for a week visiting Dharmavidya. He had had another attack of new embolisms in his lungs a few weeks ago, and had gone to see a specialist at the hospital who then kept him in the hospital for just under a week and was back home the day before we arrived.

When we arrived, he told us of another serious blockage problem. He lives in the countryside, quite remote, and is on…

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SUCCESSFUL FIRST ELEUSIS SEMINAR

Posted by David Brazier on March 15, 2019 at 16:59 2 Comments

We have just had our first Eleusis Seminar on the theme of the Philosophy of Taoism.

Sixteen people took part and from immediate feedback it seems to have been a great success.

We shall do more.

There is a second meeting of a more open kind this evening.

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