This group is to give access to and a space for discussion of spiritual issues in general and from the Western traditions, as distinct from the groups on eastern wisdom (Buddhist, Taoist etc) including the ancient sources of mystery religion, especially but not exclusively Greek mythology, religion, mysteries, oracles and practices.

27 Members
Join Us!

Access to Sources

Homeric Hymn to Demeter
Gregory Nagy translation
Hugh Evelyn-White translation

Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite
Gregory Nagy translation
Hugh G. Evelyn-White translation

You need to be a member of David Brazier at La Ville au Roi (Eleusis) to add comments!

Join David Brazier at La Ville au Roi (Eleusis)

Comments

  • I'm interested to know more about the black and white image used as the emblem for this group? Thanks in advance ....
  • Happy is the one whom the Muses love. Sweet flows the speech from that mouth. For though we have sorrow and grief in freshly-troubled spirits, and though we live in dread because our hearts are distressed, yet, when a singer, the servant of the Muses, chants the glorious deeds of men of old and the blessed gods who inhabit Olympus, at once we forget all of our heaviness and sorrows. The gifts of the goddesses soon turn us away from these cares.   Hesiod: Theogony 90-103

This reply was deleted.
E-mail me when people leave their comments –

ANSHIN DEEL DRIE  ~ Symboliek van mijn thuisland op het eiland

In de uiteenzetting van gisteren keken we naar het emoticon beeld van vrede, een duif met een olijftak in de snavel. In de oude Griekse mythologie waren de duif en de olijftak attributen van Eirene de godin van de vrede. De olijf werd ook geassocieerd met Athena, die de olijfboom had gegeven als een geschenk aan de stad Athene, hoewel in haar geval de vogel met de tak een uil was. Vanwege de vrijgevigheid van dit geschenk maakten de goden Athena tot de beschermvrouwe van de stad en zo kreeg het…

Read more…
0 Replies

Sappho's Hymn to Aphrodite

Translation, notes and metrical explanation copyright 1997 Elizabeth Vandiver; all rights reserved. Iridescent-throned Aphrodite, deathless Child of Zeus, wile-weaver, I now implore you, Don't--I beg you, Lady--with pains and torments Crush down my spirit, But before if ever you've heard my pleadings Then return, as once when you left your father's Golden house; you yoked to your shining car your Wing-whirring sparrows; Skimming down the paths of the sky's bright ether On they brought…

Read more…
1 Reply

DIOGENES

If there anyone I envy,it’s old Diogenes, dog that he was and I more a cat.But… Oh to be in a world where such naturalnesswas possible!I hope we have a few sparks in common.Like that honest man, I am a citizenof nowhere in particular.Which polis? “Cosmopolis,” says he,coining a word we still employ,but with less force than he:citizen of the world, no fear, no favour.You can’t get away with it these days.He was in search of true morality.Today he’d be locked upas a danger to common hypocrisy.Now…

Read more…
0 Replies

WITH FIRE IN THEIR HAIR

I've been reading The Bacchae by Euripedes. It is the only extant play based on the rituals of Dionysus in which women went in groups into the hills and engaged in orgiastic activities under the influence of wine. The theme of the play is the punishment of the family of Cadmus, founder of Thebes, by the god Dionysus, for the hubris and disrespect to the god shown by Pentheus, Cadmus' grandson. Pentheus does not believe in the gods and takes the influence of Dionysus upon the women of the city…

Read more…
1 Reply